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18
Jul
2016

In Wilmington, NC and Everywhere: Economic Development Is More Than Just Growth

by Scott Johnson, Chairman, Cape Fear Economic Development Council Category:

The following blog post is the second entry of a series in WilmingtonBiz.com Insights and reflects the opinion of the Cape Fear Economic Development Council. Written by Chairman Scott Johnson in support of adopting the improved community-focused Industrial Special Use Permit (SUP), it advocates for clean and responsible economic growth for New Hanover County. Cities and towns recognize the need to pursue economic growth and adopt policies and programs, including incentives, that are designed to enhance economic development opportunities. Most residents understand there is a relationship between the successful function of the local economy and the quality of life they enjoy. They also know that many community services, including public schools, are often defined by the amount of local taxes collected. But how we implement and define what economic growth means to us will be the tipping point for how an older industrial area, such as ours, will remake and rewrite the story of the power of economic innovation. Historic concepts of economic growth in American cities like Wilmington can be viewed in many ways. One view has been that all... read more +

Sebastian Bergmann Siegburg

CO landowners work with public lands for great public benefit. Photo (c) Sebastian Bergmann Siegburg

11
Jul
2016

How a Web-based Tool Can Stimulate Land Stewardship on Private Lands in Colorado

by Amos S. Eno Category:

While land conservation in the early twentieth century was dominated by the designation of public lands at the federal and state levels, private land conservation is and will be the conservation market of the 21st century, particularly in the west. Almost half of the western landscape (47 percent, according to a recent Congressional Research Service report) is managed by five federal agencies: the Bureau of Land Management, Forest Service, National Park Service, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Foundation, and the Department of Defense. However, even in a state like Idaho, where 62 percent of the land is under federal management, private landowners play a critical and important role in conservation. This is not a new concept. In 1949, Aldo Leopold postulated in A Sand County Almanac: “The geography of conservation is such that most of the best land will always be held privately for agricultural production. The bulk of responsibility for conservation thus necessarily devolves upon the private custodian, especially the farmer.” This is certainly true in Idaho, where private landowners hold 93 percent of the most productive soils, but... read more +

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5
Jul
2016

Collaboration, Teamwork and Commitment: A Formula for Reducing Wildfire Danger

by Christopher Topik, Director of NA Forest Conservation, The Nature Conservancy Category:

Once again we are witnessing tragic fires in the western United States that are harming people, water, and wildlife. In recent years, bemoaning our severe fire seasons has become an all-too common annual lament, heard from the coffee shop to Congress.  Since 1960 the shoulders of the fire season have broadened by nearly two additional months each year, due to hotter, dryer, and more dangerous forest conditions. But unlike hurricanes, tornados, and earthquakes, fires are unique; they are the one natural disaster about which we have a choice. We tend to think of fire management in terms of the massive mobilization of firefighters, air tankers, supplies, and slurry drops; instead, what if we could mobilize the social and political will to perform wide-scale proactive forest treatments, to better inoculate our communities, forests, and waters from the worst of fire’s destructive effects? This is exactly the possibility 75 of the nation’s leading experts gathered at the White House to discuss on May 18. The room included first responders and fire experts, land managers and government officials, conservationists and business... read more +

Dusk on the Cape Fear: Wilmington, N.C.
3
Jul
2016

Using the Triple-Bottom Line to Define Best Practice Resource Management in the Cape Fear

by Scott Johnson, Chairman, Cape Fear Economic Development Council Category: ,

The North Carolina Coastal Federation is leading the My Community, My Voice Campaign to engage citizens and business leaders to help adopt the improved community-focused Industrial Special Use Permit (SUP), which advocates for clean and responsible economic growth for New Hanover County. The vote is in the fall; as such, this blog will feature articles and thoughts from business leaders who are in support of this important initiative.  The following entry is the first of a series in WilmingtonBiz.com Insights and reflects the opinion of the Cape Fear Economic Development Council, written by Chairman Scott Johnson. The Cape Fear Economic Development Council (CFEDC) is a nonprofit 501c3 based in Wilmington. For the last eight years we have explored new concepts for addressing our region’s economic growth strategies, while helping identify more suitable and practical alternatives in economic development, land use, energy use and environmental management. CFEDC is neither a think tank nor an academic endeavor, but a group of citizens who believe by using the “triple bottom line” framework (people, profit, planet) to define best practices in land and resource management, we... read more +